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Little Nell Two-Ten-Yen

Story ID:6337
Written by:Monte Leon Manka (bio, contact, other stories)
Organization:retired
Story type:Poem
Location:Hemet CA. USA
Year:32767
Person:Prop Man Chelsea Kansas Kid
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Little Nell Two-Ten-Yen

Little Nell Two Ten Yen.

If you ever bargained with a Korean (remember you Korean Vets this was 1946)
Over eggs, silk or hammered copper pans
The bidding always started
With a bid of Two Ten Yen

Why you ask,
I dont know, but this I say
Is to set you up
For the Captains little Play.

One morning when the supply men
In the office were assembled
All nineteen men were there
A hodgepodge they resembled

Tall and short
Thin and fat, and in between
Some with moustaches
Most were shaven clean.

These mens homes
Stretched from California to Maine (and Pennsylvania)
Montana to Florida
And places in between.

The Captain told us about a nurse
Who was suffering great despair
Whose neck was broken in a wreck
And needed Tender lovin care.

He said she lay there
Flat on her back
With tongs into her head a rope and pulley with a weight,
To take up any slack

Shed been there
For about a week
And any hope to get up
Was looking mighty bleak.

Weve a bunch of old Field Phones
Back in the Issue room
Get them out dust them off
And put one in her room.

In the other offices of Supply, of which there were four
Hook up in each a phone
I want you Soldiers to call her any time of day
So she wont feel so alone.

The Captain said I need
Some Volunteers today
For actors and a sound effects man
To help put on a Play

With this officer you had not a doubt
About what he was going to do
And whether you should volunteer
Every hand went up, but he just picked a few.

The Captain was the mean old man
Who went to collect the rent
And little Nell Two Ten Yen had no Yen
For food she had already spent.

She had no choice but
To put up or move out
And this was what the play
Was all about.

The Captain came through the door
On his trusty steed
(I was the sound effects man)
With two short 2x4s on the floor I did flop
To make the sound of the horses clippity clop.

The Captain was dressed in a black cape
A black top hat, and black moustache, the part he played so well
He said I am here to collect the rent
But I have no Yen, said the Old Sgt. who played Little Nell

When the mean old man was finished
Yelling at Little Nell
Suddenly
From her eye a tiny tear fell

(Sound effects man, tear falling)
I had a five gallon Jerry can
Filled with water not to drink
But on my cue
I sloshed it into the sink.

I was standing behind the nurse
She almost jumped the track
She laughed so hard
While tied to that weight while lying on her back.

The Play ended well, we all took our bows
Then went back to work we went
Hoping our silliness
Was well spent.

In a few days the Capt. told us
That the Play and the phone
Had made her stay much easier
And she didnt feel alone.

She was sent home
To the United States, Shed gotten much better
We were there to see her off
Later we received a letter.

She expressed her gratitude
For all the things that we had done
To make her hospital stay bearable
And not let her feel alone.

This is one story
That will tell the reader
Why we so respected.
Capt. Knight our great leader.

When he went back home, he took all our parents phone numbers called them all (19 men) to tell them that we were all OK. Dad told me that the Captains Father called him from Georgia and talked a long time telling him about where we were and what we did. 04-30-2006, Monte Manka